Benefits

  • June 24, 2024

    Health Co. Narrows Doctor's Reneged Benefits Suit

    An Arizona federal judge trimmed a doctor's suit claiming her healthcare system employer refused to let her use her benefits to take time off to undergo cancer treatments, but kept alive claims that the company violated state and federal law by misleading her about paid leave.

  • June 24, 2024

    Teamsters Fund Must Face Pension Conversion Suit

    A West Coast-based Teamsters pension fund must keep facing claims that it shortchanged married retirees by using outdated data to convert their benefits from single-life annuity form, with a Washington federal judge deeming the suit strong enough to beat the fund's dismissal motion.

  • June 24, 2024

    Doctor Left Text Trail Describing NBA Fraud Scheme, Jury Told

    Prosecutors told a Manhattan federal jury that a Seattle medical professional sent a series of text messages detailing a plan to submit fraudulent claims to an NBA healthcare plan to obtain payouts, kicking off a second trial over the alleged scheme.

  • June 24, 2024

    Boeing Says Turbulent Securities Suit Should Be Dismissed

    Boeing has moved to dismiss a proposed securities fraud suit in Virginia federal court accusing it of misleading investors about the overall safety of its 737 Max jets, saying that the plaintiffs' "kitchen-sink" approach falls short of pleading requirements.

  • June 24, 2024

    McDermott Investors See Partial Cert. In $6B CB&I Deal Suit

    Investors in energy industry engineering company McDermott International Inc. saw part of their proposed investor class certified as a lead plaintiff is sought for a second subclass in litigation over the company's $6 billion acquisition of Chicago Bridge & Iron Company NV.

  • June 24, 2024

    PNC Beats ERISA Suit After Class Expert Found Unreliable

    PNC escaped a certified class action alleging it let employee retirement fund participants pay excessive fees after a Pennsylvania federal judge on Friday ruled that an expert witness who calculated $25 million in damages for the class of current and former employees wasn't reliable.

  • June 24, 2024

    Waste Management Co. Will Pay $395K To End 401(k) Fee Suit

    Waste management company Clean Harbors Environmental Services Inc. will pay $395,000 to resolve a proposed class action alleging it mismanaged its $813 million employee retirement plan by failing to look for less expensive funds, according to a Friday filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    DOL Still Mulling Changes To Pension De-Risking Guidance

    The U.S. Department of Labor told Congress in a new report Monday it hasn't ruled out changing guidance used by retirement plan managers when selecting an annuity provider for pension de-risking transactions, which involve the exchange of defined benefit pension plan liabilities for annuity insurance contracts.

  • June 24, 2024

    Shipping Co. Agrees To Pay $225K To Resolve 401(k) Fee Suit

    A former worker at a shipping company has asked a North Carolina federal court to greenlight a $225,000 settlement that puts an end to her proposed class action accusing the company of saddling its retirement plan with excessive administrative fees and failing to remove its expensive recordkeeper.

  • June 24, 2024

    IT Co. Settles Fired Worker's Anxiety Leave Retaliation Suit

    An information technology company has agreed to settle a former worker's suit claiming the company pushed him out of a job after he took medical leave to treat his anxiety that developed from working 16-hour days, according to a Florida federal court filing.

  • June 24, 2024

    High Court To Review State Gender Care Bans

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to review a Sixth Circuit decision that allowed Tennessee to keep in place a new ban on gender-affirming care for minors.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices To Assess Reach Of ADA To Ex-Workers' Benefit Suits

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday accepted a retired Florida firefighter's request that it decide whether former employees can lodge discrimination suits under the Americans with Disabilities Act related to post-employment benefits.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Objections To $2.67B BCBS Deal

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused on Monday to review Home Depot's challenge of a $2.67 billion settlement in antitrust litigation targeting Blue Cross Blue Shield, along with a separate challenge of the attorney fees awarded for the deal.

  • June 21, 2024

    Under Armour To Pay $434M To End Securities Fraud Claims

    Under Armour Inc. has agreed to shell out $434 million to put to rest claims it inflated stock prices by hiding declining demand for its products, investors announced Friday, reaching a deal just weeks before a jury trial was set to kick off in Maryland federal court.

  • June 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Axes 2 Symetra Structured Deal Recipient Classes

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday scrapped two classes in a lawsuit accusing an insurance conglomerate of wrongfully inducing personal injury settlement recipients to give up their rights to periodic payments in exchange for a discounted immediate lump sum payment, saying individual issues will predominate over common issues.

  • June 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Fla. Agency Win In Ex-Warden's FMLA Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit refused Friday to reinstate a former warden's lawsuit accusing the Florida Department of Corrections of transferring and demoting her because she was nearing 60 and took six months of leave, saying she failed to connect the dots to show the agency was motivated by bias.

  • June 21, 2024

    American Airlines Can't Shake ESG Retirement Class Action

    A Texas federal judge won't free American Airlines from a class action claiming its pilots' $26 billion retirement plan focused too heavily on environmental and social factors, ruling the airline's failure to push investment managers to abandon the strategy buttresses the plaintiffs' case that American endorsed it.

  • June 21, 2024

    Former CEO Wins Unpaid Benefits Suit Against Credit Union

    A Connecticut federal judge granted a win to a former CEO claiming a credit union refused to fully pay out his retirement benefits after he was abruptly fired over his Parkinson's disease diagnosis, saying he put forward enough detail to connect his termination with his disability.

  • June 21, 2024

    5th Circ. Knocks Out National Block On ACA Preventive Care

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday struck down a national injunction against Affordable Care Act requirements forcing insurers to cover a range of preventive treatments, but kept a block in place that prevents its application to the individuals and businesses in Texas that sued.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ex-Mass. Pol Hit With New Charges In COVID Fraud Case

    A former Massachusetts state senator already accused of pandemic-related fraud has been charged alongside his sister with attempting to cover up a scheme to make him eligible for unemployment benefits, the U.S. attorney's office announced Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    DOD Can't Escape LGBTQ Veterans' Discharge Bias Suit

    A California federal judge denied the U.S. Department of Defense's bid to toss a suit alleging veterans discharged under the military's former "don't ask, don't tell" ban on LGBTQ service members continue to face discrimination, finding they put forward enough proof of bias for their claims to survive dismissal.

  • June 21, 2024

    5 ERISA Cases To Watch In 2024's Second Half

    The U.S. Department of Labor will be playing defense in the second half of 2024, battling injunction bids in Texas seeking to halt the agency's recently finalized retirement security regulations, as well as fighting to uphold a DOL rule tackling social and environmental factors in retirement plan investment decisions. Here, Law360 looks at five Employee Retirement Income Security Act cases that attorneys say they will have on their radar.

  • June 21, 2024

    Attys Eye $1.4M Slice Of State Street Retirement Plan Deal

    Class counsel are requesting a one-third cut from a $4.3 million settlement with State Street Corp. to resolve claims the bank stocked its employees' 401(k) plan with imprudent funds that it managed or that were run by its subsidiaries or affiliates.

  • June 20, 2024

    UnitedHealth To Pay $1M To End NY AG Birth Control Probe

    New York Attorney General Letitia James announced Thursday that UnitedHealthcare of New York Inc. will pay $1 million to end allegations that the company violated Empire State law by refusing to fully cover an oral contraceptive.

  • June 20, 2024

    HHS Drug Pricing Program Flouts Constitution, Boehringer Says

    An "unprecedented" new Medicare price negotiation program deprives drugmakers of their constitutional rights and forces them to make declarations on issues of public concern that reflect poorly on them, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc. argued Thursday in Connecticut federal court as it echoed the industry chorus seeking to strike the initiative.

Expert Analysis

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • What DOL Fiduciary Rule Means For Private Fund Managers

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    Attorneys at Ropes & Gray discuss how the U.S. Department of Labor's recently released final fiduciary rule, which revises the agency's 1975 regulation, could potentially cause private fund managers' current marketing practices and communications to be considered fiduciary advice, and therefore subject them to strict prohibitions.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • High Court's Abortion Pill Ruling Shuts Out Future Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous ruling in U.S. Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine maintains the status quo for mifepristone access and rejects the plaintiffs' standing theories so thoroughly that future challenges from states or other plaintiffs are unlikely to be viable, say Jaime Santos and Annaka Nava at Goodwin.

  • Emerging Trends In ESG-Focused Securities Litigation

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    Based on a combination of shareholder pressure, increasing regulatory scrutiny and proposed rulemaking, there has been a proliferation of litigation over public company disclosures and actions regarding environmental, social, and governance factors — and the overall volume of such class actions will likely increase in the coming years, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Always Be Closing

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    When a lawyer presents their case with the right propulsive structure throughout trial, there is little need for further argument after the close of evidence — and in fact, rehashing it all may test jurors’ patience — so attorneys should consider other strategies for closing arguments, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Series

    Playing Chess Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    There are many ways that chess skills translate directly into lawyer skills, but for me, the bigger career lessons go beyond the direct parallels — playing chess has shown me the value of seeing gradual improvement in and focusing deep concentration on a nonwork endeavor, says attorney Steven Fink.

  • 9th Circ. Clarifies ERISA Preemption For Healthcare Industry

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in Bristol SL Holdings v. Cigna notably clarifies the broad scope of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's preemption of certain state law causes of action, standing to benefit payors and health plan administrators, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • A Closer Look At Feds' Proposed Banker Compensation Rule

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    A recently proposed rule to limit financial institutions' ability to award incentive-based compensation for risk-taking may progress through the rulemaking process slowly due to the sheer number of regulators collaborating on the rule and the number of issues under consideration, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

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