Intellectual Property

  • June 24, 2024

    Nixon Peabody Snags IP Litigator From Davis Wright In LA

    Nixon Peabody LLP continues to fortify its intellectual property practice with the addition of a former Davis Wright Tremaine LLP litigator, who joins as counsel in the firm's Los Angeles office.

  • June 24, 2024

    Justices Will Weigh Liability Of Corporate Affiliates In TM Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court will review whether a real estate development company's corporate affiliates should be responsible for a $46.6 million trademark infringement judgment — even though they were not defendants — in a case attorneys said Monday could have ramifications beyond the Lanham Act.

  • June 24, 2024

    ITC Shouldn't Oversee Patent Disputes, Utah Law Prof Argues

    The U.S. International Trade Commission should no longer be in control of deciding when infringing imports are banned from the country, a prominent patent law academic at the University of Utah's S.J. Quinney College of Law says.

  • June 24, 2024

    Pet Toy Maker Says It Never Inked Parent Co. Licensing Deal

    Pet toy maker Kong has told a Colorado federal judge that it never gave a parent company permission to use its trademark for a line of large animal toys, claiming in motions that the company used the Kong brand anyway and deleted social media accounts with evidence of the infringement.

  • June 24, 2024

    AI Cos. Hit With Copyright Claims From Music Labels

    Two artificial intelligence startups are facing copyright litigation by a group of major record labels, claiming they rip off artists' songs without getting consent.

  • June 24, 2024

    JPMorgan Should Save Data Sob Story For Feds, Argus Says

    TransUnion and its data unit Argus Information & Advisory Services have told a Delaware federal judge that they plan to seek dismissal of a JPMorgan Chase & Co. lawsuit tied to their recent $37 million settlement with the government over claims that Argus misused credit card data it was collecting from banks on regulators' behalf.

  • June 24, 2024

    Bid To Undo $71M Christmas Tree Patent Verdict Rejected

    A Minnesota federal judge on Monday rejected a posttrial motion by Polygroup Ltd. seeking to overturn a $71.4 million judgment against it for infringing rival Willis Electric Co Ltd.'s artificial Christmas tree patent, saying the company failed to show that the verdict was against the clear weight of the evidence.

  • June 24, 2024

    Flag Football Co. Fights To Keep TM Dispute Alive

    A simmering feud over the national leadership of flag football within the U.S. has intensified in Texas federal court, with the organization challenging the group holding itself out as the sport's governing body urging the judge to keep the dispute alive.

  • June 24, 2024

    DC Circ. Backs Gov't Contractor Win In Fight With Ex-Worker

    The D.C. Circuit has backed a ruling that a former senior technical manager for government contractor Apprio Inc. breached a proprietary information agreement giving the rights of certain software he created over to the company.

  • June 24, 2024

    Research Co. Seeks Sanctions On Proud Boys Atty In IP Suit

    A Texas research firm pursuing copyright infringement claims against a group of defense attorneys who represented members of the Proud Boys wants one of the lawyers sanctioned for filing "a frivolous and groundless counterclaim" in the D.C. federal court litigation.

  • June 24, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Amendments to Delaware's General Corporation Law topped the news out of the Court of Chancery again last week, as the hotly contested measure sailed through the state's legislature. Tesla and its shareholders continued their tug-of-war over attorney fees for Chancery litigation about Elon Musk's pay package, and new cases were filed involving biotechs, car rental companies, workout platforms, telecom towers, and a cargo ship fire in Brazil.

  • June 24, 2024

    High Court Passes On Religious Webcasters' Royalty Hike Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to review the federal Copyright Royalty Board's latest hike in royalty rates webcasters must pay to play audio recordings, turning away a radio trade group's appeal challenging one of the increases on religious freedom and administrative procedure grounds.

  • June 24, 2024

    High Court To Review $46.6M Award Over 'Dewberry' TM Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday granted a real estate development company's request to review a $46.6 million trademark infringement award that petitioners argued violated federal law by making its corporate affiliates responsible for the amount.

  • June 21, 2024

    Quinn Emanuel Rips Columbia's 'Utterly Meritless' Filing Bid

    Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP told the Federal Circuit on Friday that Columbia University's bid to introduce a former Norton Lifelock computer scientist's declaration claiming the company's former lawyers at the firm are lying about his refusal to testify in the school's decade-long $600 million patent case is "utterly meritless."

  • June 21, 2024

    Apple Won't Offer AI Tools In EU Due To Regulatory Concerns

    Apple confirmed Friday that the tech giant isn't planning on releasing new artificial intelligence features in the European Union this year due to "regulatory uncertainties" involving the bloc's new Digital Markets Act and the potential security risks that complying with the DMA could pose to Apple users.

  • June 21, 2024

    Drug Cos., IP Attys Back Cellect In High Court Efforts

    A petition by patent litigation outfit Cellect that is looking to persuade the U.S. Supreme Court to wade into a double patenting dispute has drawn support from even more lawyers as well as a handful of major drugmakers and small tech companies like Sonos.

  • June 21, 2024

    Drugmakers Decline To Drop Patent Listings After FTC Letters

    The eight pharmaceutical companies that the Federal Trade Commission warned in April may have improperly listed patents for its products in a key federal database have chosen not to remove any patents or otherwise alter their listings, according to a document released Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    After Fed. Circ. Win, Bausch Sues Alvogen Over Drug Patents

    Bausch's Salix Pharmaceuticals has launched a lawsuit against Alvogen's Norwich Pharmaceuticals unit in a New Jersey federal court, claiming that its planned generic version of Xifaxan, a blockbuster diarrhea and brain disorder drug, infringes a set of patents.

  • June 21, 2024

    Chicago Cubs Cry Foul Over Rooftop Owner's Ticket Sales

    The Chicago Cubs have sued the owner of a rooftop venue with a view of Wrigley Field, accusing him of selling tickets for Cubs games and other events at the stadium despite having an expired license to do so and profiting off the infringement of the Cubs' intellectual property rights.

  • June 21, 2024

    In Ruling By Albright, Fed. Circ. Revives Apple Patent Review

    The Federal Circuit on Friday vacated a Patent Trial and Appeal Board ruling that Apple failed to prove the invalidity of several claims of an Omni MedSci Inc. heart rate monitor patent, in the first decision by the appeals court authored by U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas.

  • June 21, 2024

    Treasury Unveils Rules Curtailing Outbound Tech Investments

    The U.S. Department of the Treasury on Friday proposed rules to implement President Joe Biden's executive order aimed at restricting American investments in certain technologies that China is developing, including artificial intelligence systems, that are deemed threats to national security.

  • June 21, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs DraftKings, FanDuel Alice Win Over GPS IP

    A New Jersey federal judge rightly dismissed Beteiro LLC's infringement suits against DraftKings, FanDuel and other gaming companies after finding its GPS patents can't meet patentability requirements, the Federal Circuit held Friday.

  • June 21, 2024

    5th Circ. Undoes Part Of TM Ruling In Appliance Stores' Fight

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday partly reversed a Texas federal court's conclusion that a San Antonio appliance company infringed two marks of rival business Appliance Liquidation Outlet LLC, finding that while the name of the store is a valid trademark, the shorthand "Appliance Liquidation" is not.

  • June 21, 2024

    Pay-For-Delay Drug Case Not Time-Barred, UK Tribunal Says

    The U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal refused Friday to apply a much more restrictive statute of limitations that would toss government claims that Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck Ltd. and generic drug manufacturers anticompetitively agreed to delay generic competition to an antidepressant.

  • June 21, 2024

    Ex-CEO Found Liable For $1 Now Seeks Atty Fees For Del. Suit

    The ex-CEO of a biopharma company who was found liable in 2021 for breaching his fiduciary duties but ordered to pay just $1 in damages after Delaware's Court of Chancery found that no real harm had been done is now suing for his attorney's fees and court costs.

Expert Analysis

  • Protecting Trade Secrets In US, EU Gov't Agency Submissions

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    Attorneys at Mintz compare U.S. and European Union trade secret laws, and how proprietary information in confidential submissions to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency is protected in the face of third-party information requests under government transparency laws.

  • Tailoring Compliance Before AI Walks The Runway

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    Fashion industry players that adopt artificial intelligence to propel their businesses forward should consider ways to minimize its perceived downsides, including potential job displacements and algorithmic biases that may harm diversity, equity and inclusion efforts, say Jeffrey Greene and Ivory Djahouri at Foley & Lardner.

  • Recruitment Trends In Emerging Law Firm Frontiers

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    BigLaw firms are facing local recruitment challenges as they increasingly establish offices in cities outside of the major legal hubs, requiring them to weigh various strategies for attracting talent that present different risks and benefits, says Tom Hanlon at Buchanan Law.

  • Revisiting Morals Clauses In The Age Of Deepfakes

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    Deepfakes and other forms of misrepresentation powered by artificial intelligence have complicated the traditional process of reputation management for companies entering into talent agreements with celebrities, bringing new considerations for the morals clauses that usually shield against these risks, say attorneys at Pryor Cashman.

  • Series

    Glassblowing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    I never expected that glassblowing would strongly influence my work as an attorney, but it has taught me the importance of building a solid foundation for your work, learning from others and committing to a lifetime of practice, says Margaret House at Kalijarvi Chuzi.

  • 3 Surprising Deposition Dangers Attorneys Must Heed

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    Attorneys often do not think of discovery as a particularly risky phase of litigation, but counsel must closely heed some surprisingly strict and frequently overlooked requirements before, during and after depositions that can lead to draconian consequences, says Nate Sabri at Perkins Coie.

  • Careful Data Governance Is A Must Amid Enforcement Focus

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    Federal and state regulators' heightened focus on privacy enforcement, including the Federal Trade Commission's recent guidance on consumer protection in the car industry, highlight the importance of proactive risk management, compliance and data governance, say Jason Priebe and Danny Riley at Seyfarth.

  • The Unified Patent Court: What We Learned In Year 1

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    ​​​​​​​The Unified Patent Court celebrated its first anniversary this month, and while questions remain as we wait for the first decisions on the merits, a multitude of decisions and orders regarding provisional measures and procedural aspects have provided valuable insights already, says Antje Brambrink at Finnegan.

  • Opinion

    Paid Noncompetes Offer A Better Solution Than FTC's Ban

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    A better alternative to the Federal Trade Commission's recent and widely contested noncompete ban would be a nationwide bright-line rule requiring employers to pay employees during the noncompete period, says Steven Kayman at Rottenberg Lipman.

  • Opinion

    Flawed Fintiv Rule Should Be Deemed Overreach In Tech Suit

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    A pending federal lawsuit over the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's unilateral changes to key elements of the America Invents Act, Apple v. Vidal, could shift the balance of power between Congress and federal agencies, as it could justify future instances of unelected officials unilaterally changing laws, say Patrick Leahy and Bob Goodlatte.

  • How Associates Can Build A Professional Image

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    As hybrid work arrangements become the norm in the legal industry, early-career attorneys must be proactive in building and maintaining a professional presence in both physical and digital settings, ensuring that their image aligns with their long-term career goals, say Lana Manganiello at Equinox Strategy Partners and Estelle Winsett at Estelle Winsett Professional Image Consulting.

  • Determining Who Owns Content Created By Generative AI

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    Adobe's recent terms-of-service update and ensuing clarification regarding its AI-training practices highlights the unanswered legal questions regarding ownership of content created using artificial intelligence, says John Poulos at Norton Rose.

  • Skip Versus File: The Patent Dilemma That Costs Millions

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    In the nearly 30 years since the inception of the provisional application, many have weighed the question of whether or not to file the provisional, and data shows that doing so may allow inventors more time to refine their ideas and potentially gain an extra year of protection, says Stanko Vuleta at Highlands Advisory.

  • Orange Book Warnings Highlight FTC's Drug Price Focus

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    In light of heightened regulatory scrutiny surrounding drug pricing and the Federal Trade Commission's activity in the recent Teva v. Amneal case, branded drug manufacturers should expect the FTC's campaign against allegedly improper Orange Book listings to continue, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • Firms Must Rethink How They Train New Lawyers In AI Age

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    As law firms begin to use generative artificial intelligence to complete lower-level legal tasks, they’ll need to consider new ways to train summer associates and early-career attorneys, keeping in mind the five stages of skill acquisition, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

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